Thursday, May 18, 2017

  • Friday, May 5, 2017 (All day) to Thursday, May 25, 2017 (All day)

    At Living Arts, we believe art can be a vehicle for social change. If the past few months have done nothing else, they have shown us that we are all going to have to do our part to create that change.

    It’s no secret that Oklahoma has one of the worst records of welcoming immigrants. In 2007, as the United States fell into recession and anti-immigrant sentiment grew, the Oklahoma legislature passed House Bill 1804 and Governor Brad Henry signed it into law. Also known as the Oklahoma Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act, the law’s stated purpose was to address “economic hardship and lawlessness” caused by illegal immigrants. More recently Oklahoma’s Governor, Mary Fallin, and Tulsa’s Mayor (at the time), Dewey Bartlett, stated that they will not accept any immigrants from the Syrian crisis. And now, the incoming administration wants to build a wall between Mexico and the U.S.

    Through the Crossing Borders project, we hope to give voice to the immigrants who are coming to the United States to build a better life for themselves and their families. We also hope this month-long investigation will inform non-immigrant communities of these human stories and to perhaps change misconceptions about immigrants in our community. Through the power of Art, we hope to make these goals a reality in our city.

    For everything surrounding the Crossing Borders project, please click the buttons below to learn more.

     

    Myers Gallery Spoken Word Performance
    New Dance New Music & Drumming PechaKucha

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The following components will be a part of this month-long investigation:

    1. Crossing Borders: Opening First Friday May 5, 2017, 6-9p. A group exhibition of visual art works by artists who have worked with or wish to work with the concept of immigration issues. Juried by Steve Liggett. Exhibition will remain open through May 25.

    2. Monsters’ Business: The Big Business of Immigration – an exhibition of José Pantoja’s work. Opening First Friday May 5, 2017, 6-9pm.  Pantoja grew up in Cuba where he became an accomplished painter. In 2011, he immigrated to the United States. Today, he lives and paints in Tulsa. Exhibition will remain open through May 25.

    3. “Do We Belong?” Performance piece presented by Kripalaya Dance Academy at Living Arts on May 5 at 7p. Featuring: Maya Chandwaney, Preeyom Govind, Chandini Kanderi,  Pragathi Gowda and Riya Kurella

    4. Video Without Borders Screening: Screening of 7 short videos by immigrants who reside in Tulsa, Sat, May 6, 6:30pm at Living Arts.

    5. Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras: The premier performances of José Torres-Tama’s “Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras” will transform a food vehicle into a mobile stage to address the anti-immigrant hysteria in the USA, and will take place May 18 and 19 at Living Arts at 8p.

    6. Tulsa Area Fair Housing Partnership Movie Night / Panel: May 9 at 6p, Living Arts is partnering with the Tulsa Fair Housing Partnership and The Great Tulsa Assoc. of Realtors to present the film, The House We Live In, and a panel discussion centered around discrimination issues that immigrants face in finding housing in Oklahoma.  

    7. Immigration Forum: May 16 at 5:30p, Living Arts will host a panel discussion with Rich Fisher from KWGS as the panel moderator and the following as panelists: Teresa Valero, Anh-Thuy Nguyen, Mana Tahaie and Jordan Mazariegos.

     

    Crossing Borders Cover artwork: Monsters' Business by José Antonio Pantoja Hernández

     

  • Friday, May 5, 2017 (All day) to Thursday, May 25, 2017 (All day)

    Monsters’ Business: The Big Business of Immigration

    José Antonio Pantoja Hernández was born in Cuba in 1971. As artist who grew up in the Mayabeque Province of Cuba, in the city of Bejucal, "Pantoja" received apprenticeships as a carpenter and woodworker using antiquated tools. As his interests turned to painting and sculpting, he sought visual inspiration from a small collection of art books that showcased mainly works from Masters.By 2002, Pantoja paintings began to depicted everyday life in Cuba. As a member of a state-sponsored art collective, Pantoja was eventually able to exhibit his works on the streets of the Havana promenade, "El Paseo Del Prado.” There, he would often only display one or two paintings a week, selling them to tourists. Over time, his work became more surreal and somber. Eventually, he began to paint what he calls "the errors of the Revolution." The director of the Queretaro City Museum in Mexico learned about Pantoja's work in 2011 and sent him an invitation to display his work in the museum. Pantoja was able to parlay that invitation into a special pass to leave Cuba. He said goodbye to his friends and family and boarded a plane to Mexico with eight paintings. When he landed in Mexico City in June of 2011, he decided not to exhibit his work and instead took a bus to border town of Nuevo Laredo. There, he crossed into U.S. border and asked for political asylum. The story of his defection was chronicled in August 2011 issue of This Land press, today Pantoja lives and paints in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

     

    The video below, from This Land Press and the late, great Lee Roy Chapman, "takes our favorite Cuban artist and expatriate, José Antonio Pantoja Hernández, on a driving lesson in his van. The result is a surprisingly moving portrait of Pantoja as he recounts the perils he faced in his daring escape to the United States."
     

  • Friday, May 5, 2017 (All day) to Thursday, May 25, 2017 (All day)
    Spoken Word Spoken Word Spoken Word

    Crossing Borders Group Exhibit: Opening First Friday May 5, 2017, 6-9p. A group exhibition of visual art works by artists who have worked with or wish to work with the concept of immigration issues. Juried by Steve Liggett. Exhibition will remain open through May 25.

    Believing that Art can be a vehicle for social change, Living Arts of Tulsa is presenting a series of events that constitute an artistic investigation into the current state of immigration in our state and in the U.S. The goals of this project are to amplify the voice of immigrants and to inform non-immigrant communities in Tulsa of the stories of immigrants in order to hopefully change misconceptions in our community. Through the power of Art, we hope to make these goals a reality in our city.

    Banner image: Incandescent Metatonia by Jave Yoshimoto

    Please click on the banner below to learn more about the Living Arts Crossing Borders Project

     

     

  • Friday, May 5, 2017 (All day) to Thursday, May 25, 2017 (All day)

    Believing that Art can be a vehicle for social change, Living Arts of Tulsa is presenting a series of events that constitute an artistic investigation into the current state of immigration in our state and in the U.S. The goals of this project are to amplify the voice of immigrants and to inform non-immigrant communities in Tulsa of the stories of immigrants in order to hopefully change misconceptions in our community. Through the power of Art, we hope to make these goals a reality in our city. The following components will be a part of this month-long investigation:

     

    1. Crossing Borders: Opening First Friday May 5, 2017, 6-9p. A group exhibition of visual art works by artists who have worked with or wish to work with the concept of immigration issues. Juried by Steve Liggett. Exhibition will remain open through May 25.

    2. Monsters’ Business: The Big Business of Immigration – an exhibition of José Pantoja’s work. Opening First Friday May 5, 2017, 6-9pm.  Pantoja grew up in Cuba where he became an accomplished painter. In 2011, he immigrated to the United States. Today, he lives and paints in Tulsa. Exhibition will remain open through May 25.

    3. “Do We Belong?” Performance piece presented by Kripalaya Dance Academy at Living Arts on May 5 at 7p. Featuring: Maya Chandwaney, Preeyom Govind, Chandini Kanderi,  Pragathi Gowda and Riya Kurella

    4. Video Without Borders Screening: Screening of 7 short videos by immigrants who reside in Tulsa, Sat, May 6, 6:30pm at Living Arts.

    5. Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras: The premier performances of José Torres-Tama’s “Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras” will transform a food vehicle into a mobile stage to address the anti-immigrant hysteria in the USA, and will take place May 18 and 19 at Living Arts at 8p.

    6. Tulsa Area Fair Housing Partnership Movie Night / Panel: May 9 at 6p, Living Arts is partnering with the Tulsa Fair Housing Partnership and The Great Tulsa Assoc. of Realtors to present the film, The House We Live In, and a panel discussion centered around discrimination issues that immigrants face in finding housing in Oklahoma.  

    7. Immigration Forum: May 16 at 5:30p, Living Arts will host a panel discussion with Rich Fisher from KWGS as the panel moderator and the following as panelists: Elizabeth McCormick, Anh-Thuy Nguyen, Francisco Treviño, Mana Tahaie and Jordan Mazariegos.

  • Thursday, May 18, 2017 (All day) to Saturday, May 20, 2017 (All day)
    Myers Gallery Spoken Word Performance
    New Dance New Music & Drumming PechaKucha

     

    Living Arts, Tulsa’s arts organization dedicated to presenting contemporary non-traditional art to the public, is proud to announce Tulsa ArtCar Weekend XIII. The dates for the event are May 18-20, 2017, with many different venues for the public to enjoy these unique vehicles that function both as roadworthy cars and as exciting artistic creations. For those unfamiliar, ArtCars typically involve transforming any type of vehicle, motorcycle, scooter or bicycle into a personalized creation of art. Many artists have committed to participate, with ArtCars coming from many parts of the United States to join Tulsa area ArtCar and ArtBike artists.

    For information on how to get involved and on the ARTVEHICLE INCENTIVES, please contact: Artistic Director, Steve Liggett at steve@livingarts.org

     

  • Thursday, May 18, 2017 - 8:00pm

    & Friday, May 19, 2017, 8:00pm

    Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras:

    Inspired by Luis Valdez’s legendary Teatro Campesino shows on flatbed trucks in the 60s that brought attention to the plight of migrant workers in California with public performances, José Torres-Tama & the ArteFuturo Ensemble roll out the Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras Project. They are re-purposing a used box truck donated earlier this year to Living Arts into a mobile stage, and offer a provocative and visually dynamic performance exploring the Immigration Crisis in a country that boasts having been founded by immigrants, but has been dominated by a waves of anti-immigrant hysteria.

    Torres-Tama bring his shamanistic juju to a provocative and visually dynamic performance driven by a hybrid musical sound-bed forged by Monica McIntyre, cellist, vocalist, and poet, and Michael Ward-Bergeman, accordionist and multi-instrumentalist. They proclaim that NO HUMAN BEING IS ILLEGAL! Also, the diverse ensemble aligns with the BLACK LIVES MATTER Movement to intentionally explore the parallel struggle of people of color in the United States of Amnesia, a system that seduces its citizens to embrace forgetting.

    The Taco Truck Theater is the culmination of Torres-Tama’s four-year development in Tulsa with stories from his interview process informing the experience of local immigrants, and as part of a goal to cultivate Tulsa’s Latina/no voices, poets and activists Sally Ramirez, Amairani Perez, and Jordan Mazariegos make up the full ArteFuturo Ensemble. Accompanying the New Orleans ArteFuturo Ensemble is Alana Kolundzija, bilingual stage manager and performer.

    The Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras is a national touring project that will travel across the country, and bring this timely radical dinner theater on wheels to a hungry Barrio near you! Their battle cry is NO GUACAMOLE For Immigrant Haters!

    The Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras is a National Performance Network Creation Fund Project developed and co-commissioned by Living Arts of Tulsa in partnership with Pangea World Theater and the NPN. For more information: www.npnweb.org.

    Also, supported by the National Association of Latino Arts & Culture (NALAC), New England Foundation of the Arts (NEFA) 2016 Capacity Grant, Platforms Fund 2016, Alternate ROOTS' PIA, NET/TEN Exchange Grant and MAP Fund 2015.

    Myers Gallery Spoken Word
    Day of the Dead Champagne and Chocolate

     

     

     

     

     

    Brief Artist Bio:

    Ecuadorian-born José Torres-Tama is a 2015 MAP Fund recipient for his radical Taco Truck Theater Project, and has received an NEA Regional Artist Project award for his interdisciplinary performances. As poet, visual and performance artist, he explores the Latino immigrant experience, and his ALIENS, IMMIGRANTS & OTHER EVILDOERS is a sci-fi Latino noir performance solo that exposes the hypocrisies of a system that dehumanizes immigrants while exploiting their labor. Since 1995, he has toured nationally and internationally, and Vanderbilt, Duke, Cornell and other institutions have presented his solos and lectures on art and activism. Diálogos Books New Orleans published Immigrant Dreams & Alien Nightmares, a debut collection of 25 years of poems.

     

    Video Description: This is a five-minute performance video of the Taco Truck Theater / Teatro Sin Fronteras Project devised by José Torres-Tama & the ArteFuturo Ensemble--tackling the pressing anti-immigrant hysteria and the dehumanization of a people vilified as "Illegal aliens". The diverse ensemble includes New Orleans’ artists Monica McIntyre, cellist and vocalist, Natalie “Nati” Jones, singer and performer, Roberto Carrillo, panpipes and charrango, Michael Ward-Bergeman, accordionist and drummer, and featuring Darius & Diego Torres-Copeland, singers and performers. Driven by an eclectic musical sound-bed that accompanies the spoken word poems and collective rituals and a street theater vibe with tacos being sold, we proclaim that "NO HUMAN BEING IS ILLEGAL!" Also, we align ourselves with the "BLACK LIVES MATTER Movement" to intentionally explore the parallel struggle of people of color in the United States of Amnesia, a system that seduces its people to embrace forgetting that it has historically denied equal access to its Black and Brown citizens.

    Filmed and Edited by Rodrigo Dorfman, and some show segments also filmed by Thsombe Tshanti.